Navigating Wrongful Termination Laws in Ohio: A Small Business Guide

Navigating Wrongful Termination Laws in Ohio: A Small Business Guide

What is Wrongful Termination?

Wrongful termination is a serious issue that small business owners in Ohio need to be aware of. In general, wrongful termination refers to when an employer terminates an employee’s employment in violation of state or federal law.

In Ohio, wrongful termination can occur in a variety of ways. For example, it can occur when an employer terminates an employee due to their race, gender, age, or disability. It can also occur when an employer terminates an employee in retaliation for reporting discrimination or harassment, or for taking time off for a protected reason (such as pregnancy or military service).

Illegality of Wrongful Termination

One of the most important things that small business owners in Ohio need to know about wrongful termination is that it is illegal. The law prohibits employers from terminating employees for discriminatory reasons and retaliating against employees who report discrimination or harassment.

Taking Legal Action…

Another important thing to know is that employees who have been wrongfully terminated have the right to take legal action against their former employer. This can include filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or filing a lawsuit in state or federal court.

How to Avoid Claims

In order to avoid claims, small business owners in Ohio should be aware of the state and federal laws that protect employees from discrimination and retaliation. They should also have policies and procedures in place to address discrimination and harassment, and they should train their managers and supervisors on how to handle these issues.

Additionally, small business owners should have clear and consistent procedures for terminating employees. This can include providing employees with clear performance standards, giving them the opportunity to improve their performance, and documenting any issues that lead to termination.

Another important thing to know is that small business owners can be held liable for the wrongful termination of an employee if they are found to be responsible for it. This can include both financial damages (such as lost wages and benefits) and non-financial damages (such as emotional distress).

Final thoughts…

In conclusion, wrongful termination is a serious issue that small business owners in Ohio need to be aware of. To avoid claims, they should be familiar with state and federal laws that protect employees from discrimination and retaliation, they should have policies and procedures in place to address discrimination and harassment, they should train their managers and supervisors on how to handle these issues, and they should have clear and consistent procedures for terminating employees. Contact the team at Brenden Kelly Law to learn more about how to protect your business from wrongful termination lawsuits.


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Explore our other Blog Posts for Small Business Owners: Navigating Business Law: Legal Advice for New Entrepreneurs and How to Negotiate Like a Pro: Essential Tips for Small Business Owners.

Additional Resource: Wrongful Termination: Know the Basics – This resource from the Ohio State Bar Association offers a general overview of wrongful termination, covering basic concepts and common questions. It’s a good starting point for understanding the legal landscape around employment termination in Ohio.

Time to Call a Lawyer? Legal Tips for Cleveland’s Entrepreneurs

Time to Call a Lawyer? Legal Tips for Cleveland’s Entrepreneurs

As a small business owner in Cleveland, Ohio, you will encounter several legal situations out of your depth. Luckily, you can elicit the advice and services of a lawyer before the situation gets out of hand. Seeking professional help in the nick of time turns stressful and overwhelming legal issues into salvageable problems. This article highlights three instances when you should call a lawyer.

1. Employee Issues

Several legal issues can arise as your business grows and you begin to hire employees. These may include discrimination or harassment claims, wage and hour disputes, and wrongful termination lawsuits.

Additionally, a knowledgeable attorney can help you navigate these legal challenges and ensure your business complies with state and federal employment laws. They can also help you draft employment contracts, develop employee handbooks, and advise you on best practices for managing your workforce.

2. Contract Disputes

Contracts are essential to running a business, and disputes may arise when one party doesn’t uphold their end of the agreement. These disputes may involve clients, vendors, or other business partners.

In these situations, having a skilled attorney by your side is important to help you navigate the legal complexities therein. They can help you know your legal rights and obligations, negotiate a resolution, or represent you in court if necessary.

3. Intellectual Property Issues

Protecting your intellectual property is essential to the success of your business. Whether it’s trademarks, patents, or copyrights, intellectual property is a valuable asset that differentiates your brand from rival businesses.

An experienced attorney can help you register your trademarks and patents, draft licensing agreements, and represent you in court if your intellectual property rights are infringed upon.

As a small business owner, legal issues are a reality that you may have to face at some point. Knowing when to call a lawyer and how to choose the right one in Cleveland, Ohio, can help protect your business and navigate these challenges with confidence. Contact the team at Brenden Kelley Law today to help protect you and your business. Call us at 216-644-3359.


Connect with us: Business Law | Contact Us

Explore our other Blog Posts for Small Business Owners: Navigating Business Law: Legal Advice for New Entrepreneurs and How to Negotiate Like a Pro: Essential Tips for Small Business Owners.

Additional Resource: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) – Hiring and Managing Employees page helps small business owners understand legal obligations regarding employment.