Navigating a Hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio: What to Expect for Your Property Tax Complaint

Navigating a Hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio: What to Expect for Your Property Tax Complaint

A hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio can be a daunting experience for property owners who are concerned about the amount of taxes they are paying on their property. However, with a little bit of preparation and knowledge of what to expect, you can feel more confident and in control of the process.

Important Steps

1. Introduction: Understanding the Purpose of a County Board of Revision Hearing
2. Preparing for the Hearing: Setting a Date and Gathering Evidence
3. Presenting Your Case: Submitting Evidence and Testimony
4. The County’s Presentation: Understanding the Assessed Value of Your Property
5. The Decision and Next Steps: The Outcome and Possibility of an Appeal

What to Expect

The first thing to keep in mind is that the purpose of a hearing at the County Board of Revision is to give property owners an opportunity to contest the value of their property as assessed by the county. This value is used to determine the property taxes that you will be required to pay. If you believe that the assessed value of your property is too high, you can file a complaint with the County Board of Revision to have the value reviewed.

When you file your complaint, you will be given a date and time for your hearing. This will typically be several weeks or months after you file your complaint, so it is important to plan accordingly. On the day of your hearing, you should plan to arrive at least 30 minutes early to allow yourself time to check in and get settled.

Presentation

During the hearing, you will be given the opportunity to present evidence and testimony to support your complaint. This may include documents such as property appraisals, sales records, or photographs of your property. You may also be able to call witnesses, such as real estate agents or property appraisers, to testify on your behalf.

The county will also have the opportunity to present evidence and testimony to support their assessed value of your property. This may include comparable sales data, photographs, or other information about your property.

Once both sides have presented their evidence and testimony, the County Board of Revision will make a decision on your complaint. This decision may be made immediately following the hearing, or it may be delayed for several weeks or months.

The Decision

If the County Board of Revision decides in your favor, the assessed value of your property will be lowered, and your property taxes will be adjusted accordingly. However, if the County Board of Revision decides against you, the assessed value of your property will remain the same, and you will be required to pay the taxes based on that value.

In either case, it is important to keep in mind that the decision of the County Board of Revision is not final. If you are not satisfied with the decision, you have the right to appeal to the State Board of Tax Appeals.

Overall, a hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio can be a complex and intimidating process, but with a little preparation and knowledge of what to expect, you can feel more confident and in control of the situation. Remember to gather all necessary evidence and testimony, arrive early, and be prepared to present your case in a clear and persuasive manner.

Conclusion

In conclusion, if you believe that the assessed value of your property is too high and would like to contest the value, filing a complaint with the County Board of Revision is the first step. The hearing is the opportunity for you to present evidence and testimony to support your complaint and for the county to present their evidence and testimony to support their assessed value of your property. Remember that if the decision is not favorable, you have the right to appeal the decision to the State Board of Tax Appeals.


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Top 10 Mistakes Ohio Property Owners Make When Contesting Property Valuation

Top 10 Mistakes Ohio Property Owners Make When Contesting Property Valuation

As a property owner in Ohio, it’s important to know your rights when it comes to contesting the county’s valuation of your real estate. However, many property owners make mistakes that can hurt their chances of success at the Board of Revision or Board of Tax Appeals. In this post, we will take a look at the top 10 mistakes Ohio property owners make when contesting their property’s valuation, and provide tips on how to avoid them.

Top 10 Mistakes and Tips for Ohio Property Owners

  1. Not gathering enough evidence to support their case. It is important for property owners to provide the Board of Revision or Board of Tax Appeals with a substantial amount of evidence to support their claim that the county’s valuation of their property is too high. This can include information such as comparable sales, property inspections, and other documentation that supports their position.
  2. Not being prepared for the hearing. Property owners should be prepared to present their case in front of the Board of Revision or Board of Tax Appeals. This means that they should be familiar with the relevant laws and regulations, have all of their evidence organized and easily accessible, and be prepared to answer any questions that may be asked of them.
  3. Not understanding the appeals process. Property owners should be familiar with the steps involved in the appeals process, including the deadlines for filing an appeal, the types of evidence that are required, and the procedures that will be followed during the hearing.
  4. Not hiring an attorney. While property owners are not required to hire an attorney to represent them during the appeals process, it is often helpful to do so. An attorney can help property owners navigate the legal system, gather evidence, and make the best case possible in front of the Board of Revision or Board of Tax Appeals.
  5. Not presenting their case clearly and concisely. Property owners should be able to present their case in a clear and concise manner, highlighting the reasons why they believe the county’s valuation of their property is too high and providing evidence to support their position.
  6. Not staying within the scope of the hearing. Property owners should remember that the hearing is only focused on the county’s valuation of their property and should not attempt to introduce unrelated issues or complaints.
  7. Not being respectful and professional. Property owners should be respectful and professional during the hearing, avoiding any personal attacks or outbursts that may harm their case.
  8. Not providing enough detail. Property owners should provide as much detail as possible in their evidence and testimony, including specific comparable sales, property inspections and any data that support their case.
  9. Not challenging the county’s evidence. Property owners should not be afraid to challenge the county’s evidence, pointing out any errors or inconsistencies that may weaken their case.
  10. Not following up after the hearing. Property owners should follow up with the Board of Revision or Board of Tax Appeals after the hearing to ensure that their case has been properly processed and to find out the outcome of their appeal.

Final thoughts…

Overall, it is important for property owners to be well-informed, organized, and respectful when contesting the county’s valuation of their real estate at the Board of Revision or Board of Tax Appeals. By avoiding these common mistakes, property owners can increase their chances of successfully reducing their property taxes. However, it’s also important to keep in mind that property owners should have a good knowledge of the county’s laws, regulations and the appeals process. It is also advisable to consult with an attorney if you are not sure about any step in the process.


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Navigating Unfavorable Property Tax Assessments: How to Appeal and Why You Need an Attorney

Navigating Unfavorable Property Tax Assessments: How to Appeal and Why You Need an Attorney

Improper Property Tax Assessments

As a property owner, you may find yourself facing an unfavorable property tax assessment at some point. This can happen for a variety of reasons, including errors in the appraisal process, changes in the market, or even simple mistakes made by the county assessor. Regardless of the cause, an improper property tax assessment can have a significant impact on your finances and your property ownership experience. In this blog post, we will discuss how improper property tax assessments can impact you, why they occur, and how you can appeal them with the help of a property tax appeals attorney.

The first and most obvious impact of an improper property tax assessment is the financial burden it can place on you. If your property is assessed at a higher value than it is actually worth, you will end up paying more in property taxes than you should. This can add up over time, especially if the assessment is not corrected. Additionally, an incorrect assessment can also affect your ability to refinance your mortgage, sell your property, or even make improvements to your home.

So, why do unfavorable property tax assessments occur?

There are several factors that can contribute to this problem, including errors in the appraisal process, changes in the market, and even simple mistakes made by the county assessor. In some cases, the assessor may not have access to accurate data or may not be familiar with the specific characteristics of your property. In other cases, the assessor may not take into account important factors such as property condition, location, and recent sales data.

Process

If you find yourself facing an unfavorable property tax assessment, it is important to know that you have the right to appeal. The first step in the appeals process is to file a complaint with the County Board of Revision (CBR). This must be done within a specific timeframe, typically within the first half of the year. The complaint must include the property owner’s name, address, and legal description of the property, the current value of the property, and the owner’s opinion of the property’s value.

At the CBR, you will have the opportunity to present evidence and argue that your assessment is incorrect. This can include things like recent sales data for similar properties in the area, property condition, and any other relevant information that would support your case. If the CBR finds that your assessment is incorrect, they will adjust it accordingly. If you are not satisfied with the decision of the CBR, you can appeal to the Ohio Board of Tax Appeals. The appeal must be filed within a specific timeframe, typically within 30 days of the CBR decision.

While the appeals process may seem straightforward, it can be complex and time-consuming. This is where a property tax appeals attorney can help. An attorney who specializes in property tax appeals can help you navigate the process, gather and present evidence, and argue your case to ensure that your property is assessed at its fair market value. They can also assist you in filing paperwork and meeting deadlines, ensuring that your case is heard in a timely manner.

In addition to challenging property tax valuations, a property tax appeals attorney can also assist property owners with property tax exemptions and abatements, which can provide relief from property taxes for certain groups such as veterans or senior citizens.

Conclusion

In conclusion, improper property tax assessments can have a significant impact on your finances and property ownership experience. If you find yourself facing an unfavorable assessment, it is important to know that you have the right to appeal. With the help of a property tax appeals attorney, you can navigate the complex appeals process, gather and present evidence, and argue your case to ensure that your property is assessed at its fair market


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