Empower Your Business: Master the 2024 Tax Deadlines

Empower Your Business: Master the 2024 Tax Deadlines

In the complex world of business, managing your tax obligations is a cornerstone of success and legal compliance. With the onset of 2024, it’s imperative for business owners to familiarize themselves with the critical tax deadlines affecting various business structures. It helps you dodge hefty fines and stick to tax laws. Knowing when to file tax returns and make payments is crucial. Below, we outline the key tax calendar dates and deadlines for businesses in 2024, drawing on the structure provided for 2023.

1) January 31, 2024: Deadline for Distributing Tax Forms

Businesses must issue W-2 forms to employees and 1099-NEC or 1099-MISC forms to independent contractors for services provided in the previous year. The cutoff date for furnishing these documents is January 31,. This deadline is important to give everyone enough time for their tax preparations.

2) March 15, 2024: Tax Returns for Partnerships, S Corporations, and LLCs

For partnerships, S corporations, and LLCs elected to be treated as partnerships for tax purposes, the deadline to file tax returns is March 15. This date applies if your business follows the calendar year. For those operating on a fiscal year, the deadline is based on the IRS fiscal year schedule. Additionally, if you wish to elect S corporation status for 2024, you must submit Form 2553 by this date.

3) April 15, 2024: Deadlines for C Corporations, Sole Proprietorships, and Individuals

C corporations, sole proprietors, single-member LLCs, or LLCs taxed as corporations, alongside individuals, must file their tax returns by April 15, 2024. This date also marks the final opportunity to contribute to traditional and Roth IRAs for the 2023 tax year.

4) October 15, 2024: Extended Tax Return Deadline

Should you have obtained an extension for your 2023 income tax return, the extended deadline to submit your tax documents is October 15, 2024. This extension provides additional time to gather necessary information and ensure accuracy in your tax filings.

5) Quarterly Estimated Tax Payment Deadlines for 2024

For those required to make estimated tax payments remember the following deadlines for the 2024 tax year:

  • April 15, 2024: Q1 estimated tax payment
  • June 17, 2024: Q2 estimated tax payment (adjusted due to the 15th falling on a weekend)
  • September 16, 2024: Q3 estimated tax payment (adjusted due to the 15th falling on a weekend)
  • January 15, 2025: Q4 estimated tax payment for 2024

Should any of these dates land on a weekend or federal holiday, the deadline will be the next business day.

How to File a Tax Extension as a Business Owner

If more time is needed to prepare your tax return, you can apply for an extension, granting an additional six months to file. It’s crucial to understand that this extends only the filing deadline, not the payment due date for estimated taxes. Use IRS Form 4868 for sole proprietors and Form 7004 for partnerships, S corporations, and C corporations.

Timely payment of estimated taxes is crucial to avoid penalties. Staying informed of these critical dates helps ensure your business meets its tax obligations and maintains compliance with tax laws. Should you need guidance or assistance in managing your tax responsibilities, consulting with a professional is always advisable. For expert advice and support, consider reaching out to Brenden Kelley Law at 216-644-3359, where we’re ready to assist you with your tax planning and compliance needs.


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Explore our other Blog Posts for Business Owners 5 Important contracts to know when starting a Small Business and Choosing the Best Corporation in Ohio: S-Corp or C-Corp?

Additional Resource: Visit the IRS’ Small Business Self-Employed Tax Center for access to important information, dates, forms, and guidance.

Navigating a Hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio: What to Expect for Your Property Tax Complaint

Navigating a Hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio: What to Expect for Your Property Tax Complaint

A hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio can be a daunting experience for property owners who are concerned about the amount of taxes they are paying on their property. However, with a little bit of preparation and knowledge of what to expect, you can feel more confident and in control of the process.

Important Steps

1. Introduction: Understanding the Purpose of a County Board of Revision Hearing
2. Preparing for the Hearing: Setting a Date and Gathering Evidence
3. Presenting Your Case: Submitting Evidence and Testimony
4. The County’s Presentation: Understanding the Assessed Value of Your Property
5. The Decision and Next Steps: The Outcome and Possibility of an Appeal

What to Expect

The first thing to keep in mind is that the purpose of a hearing at the County Board of Revision is to give property owners an opportunity to contest the value of their property as assessed by the county. This value is used to determine the property taxes that you will be required to pay. If you believe that the assessed value of your property is too high, you can file a complaint with the County Board of Revision to have the value reviewed.

When you file your complaint, you will be given a date and time for your hearing. This will typically be several weeks or months after you file your complaint, so it is important to plan accordingly. On the day of your hearing, you should plan to arrive at least 30 minutes early to allow yourself time to check in and get settled.

Presentation

During the hearing, you will be given the opportunity to present evidence and testimony to support your complaint. This may include documents such as property appraisals, sales records, or photographs of your property. You may also be able to call witnesses, such as real estate agents or property appraisers, to testify on your behalf.

The county will also have the opportunity to present evidence and testimony to support their assessed value of your property. This may include comparable sales data, photographs, or other information about your property.

Once both sides have presented their evidence and testimony, the County Board of Revision will make a decision on your complaint. This decision may be made immediately following the hearing, or it may be delayed for several weeks or months.

The Decision

If the County Board of Revision decides in your favor, the assessed value of your property will be lowered, and your property taxes will be adjusted accordingly. However, if the County Board of Revision decides against you, the assessed value of your property will remain the same, and you will be required to pay the taxes based on that value.

In either case, it is important to keep in mind that the decision of the County Board of Revision is not final. If you are not satisfied with the decision, you have the right to appeal to the State Board of Tax Appeals.

Overall, a hearing at a County Board of Revision in Ohio can be a complex and intimidating process, but with a little preparation and knowledge of what to expect, you can feel more confident and in control of the situation. Remember to gather all necessary evidence and testimony, arrive early, and be prepared to present your case in a clear and persuasive manner.

Conclusion

In conclusion, if you believe that the assessed value of your property is too high and would like to contest the value, filing a complaint with the County Board of Revision is the first step. The hearing is the opportunity for you to present evidence and testimony to support your complaint and for the county to present their evidence and testimony to support their assessed value of your property. Remember that if the decision is not favorable, you have the right to appeal the decision to the State Board of Tax Appeals.


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Tax Deadlines Business Owners Need to Know for 2023

Tax Deadlines Business Owners Need to Know for 2023

As a business owner, staying on top of your tax obligations is crucial to avoid costly penalties and ensure compliance with federal and state tax laws. With different filing deadlines for various business structures and types, it’s important to know when your tax returns and estimated tax payments are due. Here are the key tax calendar dates to watch for in 2023.

1) Jan. 31, 2023: Provide Tax Forms to Employees and Contractors

As an employer, you must provide tax forms to any employees or independent contractors you hired the previous year. This includes W-2 forms for employees and 1099-NEC or 1099-MISC forms for independent contractors. The deadline for providing these forms to recipients is January 31, 2023.

2) March 15, 2023: Business Tax Returns for Partnerships, S Corporations, and LLCs

Another important date if your business is a partnership, S corporation, or LLC taxed as a partnership is March 15, 2023.  You must file your tax return by March 15, 2023, if you follow the calendar year. However, if your business’s tax year doesn’t start on January 1, you’ll need to follow the IRS fiscal year due date. This is also the deadline to file Form 2553 to elect S corporation status for tax year 2023.

3) April 18, 2023: Tax Returns for C Corporations, Sole Proprietorships, and Individuals

This is the deadline for C corporations, sole proprietorships, single-member LLCs or LLCs taxed as corporations, and individuals to file their tax returns. Additionally, this is the last day to make 2022 contributions to traditional and Roth IRAs.

4) Oct. 16, 2023: Extended Individual Tax Return Deadline

If you received a filing extension on your 2022 income tax return, your extended individual return is due on this date.

5) 2023 Quarterly Estimated Tax Payment Deadlines

If you’re self-employed or receive any form of income that requires you to pay estimated taxes, here are the estimated tax due dates for 2022:

  • April 15, 2023 – Deadline for 2022 Q1 estimated tax payments
  • June 15, 2023 – Deadline for 2022 Q2 estimated tax payments
  • Sept. 15, 2023 – Deadline for 2022 Q3 estimated tax payments
  • Jan. 15, 2024 – Deadline for 2022 Q4 estimated tax payments

Note that if any of the above dates fall on a weekend or federal holiday, the payment deadline falls on the next business day instead.

How to File a Tax Extension as a Business Owner

If you need more time to file your taxes, you can apply for a tax-filing extension. This extension will give you an extra six months to file your return. However, a tax extension only extends your filing deadline, meaning you still need to pay any estimated tax payments on your business’s tax deadline. Here’s how to file a tax extension for your business:

  • Sole proprietors can request a tax extension using IRS Form 4868.
  • Partnerships, S corporations, and C corporations can request an extension using IRS Form 7004.

Make sure to pay your estimated taxes on time to avoid any late fees!

In conclusion, staying on top of tax deadlines is essential for business owners. By keeping track of these key dates, you can avoid penalties and ensure your business stays in compliance with federal and state tax laws. If you have any questions or concerns about filing your taxes, don’t hesitate to consult with a tax professional or legal expert. Please call Brenden Kelley Law at 216-644-3359 so that we can assist you.


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Additional Resource: Read the IRS’ January 2023 Press Release detailing important information for this tax season.

Consumer Law Issues for Dentists: What You Need to Know

Consumer Law Issues for Dentists: What You Need to Know

Understanding consumer law is vital for dentists starting or running a dental practice. This guide explores key legal aspects, from informed consent to HIPAA compliance, ensuring your practice adheres to consumer law and avoids legal pitfalls.

Consumer Law and Informed Consent for Dentists

One of the most important issues for dentists is obtaining informed consent from patients before performing any dental procedure. Informed consent requires that you provide detailed information about the proposed treatment, viable alternatives, and any foreseeable risks of the procedure. It’s essential to address all patient inquiries and secure a signed informed consent form from them. Failure to obtain informed consent can result in legal action. If you’re unsure of the requirements where your practice is located, consult a dental lawyer.

Upholding Dental Patient Rights

As a dentist, you must uphold dental patient rights, as set forth by the Ohio licensing board. This includes standards related to care, reporting, records, and other dental patient rights issues. Any violations of these rights can lead to sanctions and lawsuits.

HIPAA Compliance: A Consumer Law Perspective for Dentists

HIPAA sets the standard for protecting sensitive patient data, including dental records. This means that you must take the necessary steps to protect physical and digital records and information regarding patient diagnosis and treatment. Confidentiality of patient data is paramount unless explicit written consent is provided for disclosure to third parties like insurance companies.

Dental Malpractice and Clinical Negligence

Dental malpractice claims may emerge if there’s a deviation from the widely accepted care standards during patient treatment. This can result in nerve injuries, failure to diagnose oral cancer or periodontal disease, and wrongful tooth extraction. If you’re facing a dental malpractice lawsuit, consult a malpractice lawyer immediately. Resolving clinical negligence lawsuits can be expensive and complex, though they are generally covered by malpractice insurance.

Associate Agreements: What to Look Out For

When considering associate agreements, carefully assess the merits of the offer and scrutinize for any limiting clauses, such as transfer of ownership of patient charts, non-solicitation provisions, and non-compete clauses. If you’re unsure of the potential legal implications of an offered associate agreement, discuss the contract with an attorney.

Practice Buy-Ins and Partnership Agreements: Know What You’re Getting Into

Partnership contracts determine aspects like tax obligations, legal liabilities, management duties, and several other business elements. It’s important not to sign such a document unless you are sure that all the legal consequences are in your best interests—or at the very least that you are fully informed of their consequences.

In conclusion, adhering to consumer law in the dental field is essential. From informed consent to HIPAA and malpractice, understanding these legal aspects is crucial for the smooth operation of your dental practice. For assistance in navigating consumer law in dentistry, contact Brenden Kelley Law at 216-644-3359.


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Explore Our Blog Posts for Dentists: Unlocking Legal Secrets: The Roadmap to Successful Dental Practice Acquisition and The Best Entity and Tax Choices for Dental Practices.

Additional Resource: To ensure your dental practice is fully compliant with HIPAA regulations, visit the official Health and Human Services website for detailed guidance on HIPAA compliance in dentistry.

The Best Entity and Tax Choices for Dental Practices

The Best Entity and Tax Choices for Dental Practices

One of the most crucial decisions when opening a dental practice is choosing the right entity and tax structure. What may seem like a simple task at first can quickly become overwhelming. There are many nuances and considerations that make it nearly impossible to select the default best choice. In this blog post, I have highlighted some practical options for small dental practices with one or two owners.

Avoid the Liability of Sole Proprietorships and General or Limited Partnerships

One of the easiest entities a person can form is a sole proprietorship. However, it offers zero protection from personal liability. That means if the business fails you’re personally on the hook. General and limited partnerships also have zero protection from personal liability.

Limited Liability Companies and Corporations afford the most protections.

For personal liability protection, it is best to form either a limited liability company (LLC) or a corporation. Both entities shield the owner(s) from the acts or omissions of the entity’s employees and other business operation liabilities. LLCs and corporations are both good choices when it comes to personal liability protection. However, they have different corporate formalities that must be followed. Corporations have more formalities, such as requirements to maintain minutes and have certain meetings, while LLCs do not have such obligations.

Understand the Tax Implications

When it comes to taxation, the entities have different requirements and implications. A partnership is a pass-through entity, which means all income, losses, and credits flow through to the partners’ individual income tax returns. However, partnerships must file a tax return even though the entity itself is not subject to tax. A C corporation is subject to double taxation, which means the corporation is taxed on all the business earnings, and those earnings are taxed again when paid out as dividends. An S corporation is subject to only one level of tax and can reduce the employment tax liability of the owners by managing their reasonable compensation in relation to the S corporation’s net-profit distributions.

For LLCs and corporations, the entities can be taxed as either a C corporation or an S corporation. However, if a dentist chooses a corporation as their entity, they must understand the corporation’s limitations in terms of tax flexibility from initial formation through to the sale of the dental practice.

Choose What Works Best for You

While there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to choosing the right entity and tax structure for your dental practice, there are clear pros and cons to each. Your choice will depend on various factors, including the number of owners, the number of dentists, business objectives, personal liability protection, and tax savings.

Consulting with an attorney to evaluate the options is a crucial step in making the best decision for you and your practice. Call our firm today at 216-644-3359 so that we can help you open your dental practice and protect your interests.


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Explore Our Blog Posts for Dentists: Unlocking Legal Secrets: The Roadmap to Successful Dental Practice Acquisition and Consumer Law Issues for Dentists: What You Need to Know.

Additional Resource: For a comprehensive understanding of business structures, visit the Small Business Administration’s guide on choosing the right structure for your dental practice.